Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2018

31 countries, 61 cities, 230 participants came together to learn from the mobility and access lessons offered by Dar es Salaam and discuss the theme around making space for mobility in booming cities.

View pictures from MOBILIZE here.

  • DAY 1

  • DAY 2

  • DAY 3

    • Radical Solutions for Urban Growth
      PLENARY

      All over the world, rapid urbanization is forcing cities to reckon with the realities of insufficient planning in the face of demands from a growing population that puts increased pressure on infrastructure. These demands on city space and services often outpace the ability of planners to respond, resulting in poor outcomes for infrastructure development and mobility services. This session focuses on innovative solutions that cities are employing to respond and adapt to these pressures.

    • BreatheLife: A Global Air Quality Campaign
      INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP

      Urbanization, transport and air pollution are intrinsically linked. Air pollution kills seven million people a year. Through targeted communication strategies, the BreatheLife campaign offers tactics and tools to combat health impacts from transport. Participants attending this session will be challenged to design their very own BreatheLife strategy after a discussion of critical issues surrounding transport and air quality.

    • From Seattle to Shenzhen: Planning Dockless Bikeshare that Works for Cities
      INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP

      Dockless bike share is taking cities by storm, and creating challenges around shared public space. This session will introduce the new version of ITDP’s Bikeshare Planning Guide, with a focus on integrating dockless into city and neighborhood planning.

    • Inclusive Street Design: The Key to Great Cities
      INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP

      This TUMI capacity building session demonstrates tools for inclusive street design methods that have succeeded in making streets safer for walking and cycling in cities. Participants will be emboldened to transform poor and dangerous streets into safe environments that are comfortable for women, children, disabled, elderly and all users.

    • Keeping the Rapid in Bus Rapid Transit: Improving BRT Operations
      INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP

      This TUMI capacity building session will be a discussion of the operational challenges many BRT systems face long after opening. Using case studies from BRT systems around the world, solutions to overcome those challenges in different context will be addressed.

    • Urban95: Mobility for Young Children
      INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP

      If you could see the city from an elevation of 95 centimeters, the average height of a healthy 3 year old, how would you plan transportation, neighborhoods and a mix of activities differently? By incorporating a focus on early childhood development (ages 0-5) into mobility, it is clear that urban environments pose a multitude of challenges such as unsafe streets, poor air quality and inaccessible public transport. Based on the Bernard van Leer Foundation’s Urban95 Starter Kit, participants will explore where to start planning for young children and their caregivers to create healthy, prosperous and vibrant cities, and provide the best start in life for their youngest residents. Please review the Urban95 Starter Kit (available on the MOBILIZE app) before the session.

    • In Conversation with Carolina Tohá, Former Mayor of Santiago, Chile; Moderated by Philipp Rode, Executive Director, LSE
      KEYNOTE
    • Market Solutions vs. Government Capacity
      PLENARY

      Market solutions are sometimes at odds with government capacity constraints to set and enforce policies for the public good. Reliance on the market must be balanced with the government’s role in serving the public interest without unnecessarily monopolizing services, limiting innovation or accepting inertia in providing better mobility. This session will explore how mobility systems, including goods delivery, can best be deployed for the public good through government or market mechanisms.

    • Decarbonization of the Transport Sector and Urban Form
      BREAKOUT

      As 80 percent of GHG emissions come from cities and 14 percent come from the transport sector, changes in the way we move cities can have a major positive effect, and is even more essential in rapidly growing cities such as Dar es Salaam. From fossil fuel free street declarations to low emission zones, this session will discuss the challenges and opportunities different strategies present.

    • Labor and New Mobility
      BREAKOUT

      Mobility related occupations will continue to evolve as the value of physical ownership and manufacturing shifts toward digital services and data networks. The labor implications of emerging technologies will impact the passenger and urban freight sectors. This session will discuss the labor implications of formalizing mobility, balancing with informal activity and the challenges posed by new mobility systems.

    • The Informality and Governance Dilemma
      BREAKOUT

      Rapid urbanization is not always accompanied by economic development. Seventy percent of Dar’s five million residents, and one third of the world’s urban population lives in informal, unplanned settlements, which are a byproduct of the socioeconomic inequality of rapid urbanization. They often serve as entry points to for the newest migrants, and are fundamentally lacking in quality infrastructure, services, and access to transit. This session will discuss the vital role these informal economic systems play, and the governance challenges they pose.

    • Urban Mobility That Improves Child Health
      BREAKOUT

      Traffic collisions are the number one cause of death and injury for children. The vast majority of these incidents happen in low and middle-income countries. The good news is that street design interventions, along with speed limits and enforcement, are already making a huge difference all around the world. This session will show how interventions and policies, including Vision Zero, have succeeded in improving the safety and quality of life for children, the elderly, and others.

    • Advancing Inclusive City Design from Fringe to Mainstream
      PLENARY

      It has been clear for decades that cities centered on transit provide the greatest, most equitable access for everyone, at a greatly reduced cost to society. A truly equitable city ensures that the needs of everyone are taken into account in transport planning. Women, children, the elderly, the disabled, and many others are often left with inadequate or unsafe access to their city. This session will discuss best practices in designing inclusive transit systems.

    • Making Roads Work for People
      BREAKOUT

      The demands for curb space on city streets is increasing. Streets are used for mobility but also as places for stationary activities. New mobility services, e-commerce and growing demand to make streets work for pedestrians, children, elderly and other users are forcing cities to rethink the value of their street space and how to best balance different needs. Communicating trade-offs in policy decisions is necessary. This session will look at challenges and successes in cities around the world in using design and travel demand management strategies to better manage streets.

    • Pecha Kucha: Tactics for Booming Cities
      BREAKOUT

      Speakers will present a variety of tactics in 20 powerpoint slides progressing automatically every 30 seconds. This quick-paced selection of global case studies will be an engaging roundup of some of the most salient strategies cities are using to address rapid urbanization. Topics of focus include urban frieght, street design in Kenya + India, managing streets for children, and bus pilots.

    • Transit Options in a Multi-Modal City
      BREAKOUT

      BRT systems function better when they are integrated with feeder networks, such as rickshaws, minibuses and other 2- and 3-wheeler modes. Meanwhile, smaller modes may be hubs of their own when form rapid transit systems do not exist. This session will discuss how high capacity rapid transit works in tandem with smaller modes that are an important, nimble service in a rapidly growing city.

    • Women, Access, and Equity
      BREAKOUT

      When neighborhoods lack a mix of resources, the responsibility typically falls on women to take extra trips to get what their families need. To alleviate women’s caretaker burdens, cities need gender-responsive policies to address women’s diverse mobility patterns and needs. This session will present options for more accessible cities, neighborhoods, and transit hubs.

    • Architecture that Heals: Promoting Justice and Human Dignity in City Design
      KEYNOTE